Articles Posted in Motorcycle Injury Accidents

Although motorcycles offer a convenient, fast, and mobile alternative to a traditional commute plan, they also come with a number of risks. After all, motorcyclists are often difficult for other drivers to see and if involved in an accident they can often suffer from significant injuries or even death. Because motorcycles also lack the metal exterior and protection a passenger vehicle would typically provide a driver, the risk of injury and death is often even higher.

According to a recent news report, a motorcycle accident left one individual injured. Based on a preliminary investigation, a motorcyclist was traveling east with a passenger vehicle traveling behind them. The passenger vehicle then attempted to change lanes to pass the motorcycle, but its front bumper crashed into the rear end of the motorcycle. The motorcyclist lost control and was thrown from their bike but remained alert. They were transported to a local hospital with significant injuries and were listed as in critical condition. The accident remains under investigation.

Following a major accident, filing a lawsuit may be the furthest thing from your mind. After all, if you experienced any injuries following a motorcycle accident, your primary focus is likely on getting the treatment and medical support you need so that you can get back on your feet as quickly as possible. If you’ve been injured in a motorcycle accident, however, you should consider filing a personal injury claim as soon as possible. In a successful lawsuit, you could be compensated for any medical expenses, physical therapy, or treatments you receive as a result of the injuries you suffered from the accident.

It should be common knowledge that riding a motorcycle is more dangerous than driving the same distance in a car or other motor vehicle, however the amount that such danger increases can be surprising. Some sources claim that a motorcyclist is 26 times more likely to die in an accident than a driver or a passenger in an automobile. Because of this increase in danger, both motorcyclists and other drivers should be extra vigilant in situations where motorcycles and other vehicles share the road. A recently published local news report discusses a motorcycle crash last month that nearly killed a Harley rider.

According to the local news report, the accident occurred one afternoon last month after a pickup truck attempted to make a left turn into oncoming traffic. As the truck attempted to make the turn, a Harley Davidson motorcycle was being driven through the intersection by a 51-year-old man. The truck collided with the motorcycle in the intersection, ejecting the biker from his vehicle and resulting in critical injuries. The driver of the truck was not injured in the crash.

This horrifying and tragic crash demonstrates the fact that vehicles traveling on Maryland roads must be prepared to yield the right of way to smaller vehicles and pedestrians when sharing the road. If a motor vehicle operator is only looking out for other large vehicles, it places the operators of motorcycles, scooters, and bicycles, as well as pedestrians, at risk. If a driver fails to see a smaller vehicle and is involved in a crash, they could face civil and criminal liability for their actions, as well as administrative actions against their driver’s license.

After seeking medical assistance, the next step a Maryland accident victim should take is to consult with an attorney. While speaking to an insurance adjustor or other party may seem harmless, many seemingly innocuous statements can drastically impact a victim’s recovery. Under conditions of extreme duress, a party may make a statement expressing guilt or remorse for an accident; however, this does not necessarily amount to an admission of guilt.

Apologizing after an accident does not equate with admitting blame; the other driver’s insurance company or attorney may use those statements as an admission of fault. Although it might go against a person’s inherent character, it is generally advisable to avoid apologizing after a Maryland accident. It is best practice to limit conversations to ensure the safety of all parties and contact emergency responders and law enforcement.

Saying “I am sorry” after an incident does not legally implicate guilt or fault, but an opposing party may argue that it does. In another state, this may not make much of a difference; however, because of Maryland’s strict contributory negligence laws, an innocent statement of concern can bar a victim’s financial recovery. On the other hand, a victim may be able to sue an at-fault party’s statement in their claim for recovery.

Sometimes, when accidents take place on another person’s land, certain liabilities arise for the landowner. These liabilities and responsibilities are known as a landowner’s “duty of care” in the realm of premises liability law. When individuals enter another person’s property under the assumption that it is safe, however, and are injured, it is crucial that they understand laws governing this area to best advocate for themselves in case of legal action.

In a recent appellate decision, the court had to consider a landowner’s potential liability in a motorcycle accident lawsuit. In the case in question, a car collided with a motorcycle, resulting in catastrophic injuries. After the accident, a deputy observed tall grass near the intersection where the accident took place that would have limited or prohibited a view of the motorcyclist while traveling. The grass was growing in a ditch on the defendant company’s property.

The motorcyclist’s wife sued the defendant company, citing negligence for “allowing grass to grow so high on their property that it blocked the view of the roadway.” The defendant moved for summary judgment, which the trial court granted. The court of appeals affirmed the trial court’s decision, with the majority holding that because the grass was wholly contained on the defendant’s property, there was no duty to the traveling public.

Even when an accident case seems straightforward, determining liability and apportioning fault after a Maryland car accident can be challenging. This is especially true because Maryland follows strict contributory negligence laws that bar recovery if the plaintiff is at all responsible for the accident. As such, parties will go to great lengths to dispute liability and challenge claims. Although police reports and eyewitnesses may provide insight into what occurred, these cases typically require an in-depth investigation.

A critical part of any accident investigation is recreating the scene to determine the facts leading up to the collision. The inherent nature of motorcycles and motorcycle accidents makes this first step exceedingly challenging. Motorcycles tend to end up in dramatically different positions than from where they started. When this occurs, authorities, insurance companies, and fact-finders may need to engage in lengthy investigations to determine fault. Moreover, because of the state’s laws, it is more likely that at-fault parties will refute claims and assert contributory negligence theories- with the understanding that the plaintiff will not be able to recover at all.

Motorcyclists traveling in a group often further complicate things, as the accidents tend to be more severe. For instance, a recent news report described a multi-motorcycle chain reaction accident. According to reports, the bikers were riding eastbound when they approached a traffic light. The motorcyclist leading the group slowed his bike; however, the biker behind him could not stop, and a chain-reaction collision ensued. That biker was not wearing a helmet and was life-flighted to a medical center to receive treatment for his serious injuries. Three of the other bikers involved in the accident also suffered injuries.

Motorcycles are a great way to get around, especially during this time of year. However, hopping on a bike also carries its fair share of risks. Motorcycles don’t offer rides the same protection as other vehicles and, not surprisingly, serious injuries are very common in Maryland motorcycle accidents.

Not only are motorcycle accidents more serious than accidents involving other vehicles, but they also happen more frequently. Due to the smaller profile of motorcycles, many drivers have a hard time noticing a rider, and, even if they do, they may have a more difficult time assessing their speed. This is one reason why left-turn motorcycle accidents are so common – drivers misjudge the speed of an oncoming motorcyclist and cut them off.

Recently, a motorcycle accident in Mechanicsville, MD, resulted in a rider suffering serious injuries. According to a local news report, the accident occurred at 6:35 p.m. on Memorial Day near the 27000 block of Three Notch Road, in the area of Old Village Road.

Sometimes, when a Maryland motorcycle accident occurs, it is unclear what exactly happened. These accidents can happen in the blink of an eye, and it is surprisingly easy for the people involved and those who witnessed it to actually have no idea what happened. But, in some cases, there is actually a video of the crash. Recently, a certain video of motorcyclists on the interstate made headlines when it showed that the motorcyclists were breaking the law, a huge hazard and potentially leading to major crashes.

According to a local news article, the video shows motorcyclists breaking the law doing slow tricks on the interstate. These slow tricks can be a huge frustration for other drivers on the interstate—they can interfere with the flow of traffic and cause accidents. In short, they put the whole public and drivers in danger. For instance, earlier this year, a group of motorcyclists doing these tricks was in the way of traffic, and a truck tried to pass them but ended up crashing into one. Both the truck driver and the motorcyclist were taken to the hospital, showing how reckless driving can cause serious crashes. And, it is helpful when these motorcycle tricks are caught on camera—if an accident is caused, then officials can refer back to the video to know exactly what happened. These videos can also be used in personal injury lawsuits to prove who caused the accident and who is liable for the ensuing damage.

However, videos like this can cause the general public to believe that all motorcyclists are reckless and constantly causing accidents. But this is an unfair characterization—most motorcyclists are cautious and responsible. If they get into an accident, it is very possible that they were not the cause—but because of videos like these, others involved may assume that it was the motorcyclists’ fault. Even in cases where motorcyclists are hit by cars and injured or even killed, there may be a dominant narrative that it was their fault. Not only is this unfair, but it can really affect the outcome of their personal injury lawsuit, should they choose to file one. They may want to recover against a driver who hit them and caused them injuries, but perhaps the jury is unfairly biased against them and presumes it was their fault. In situations like this, the motorcyclist will want to rebut this assumption and make their best possible case to the judge, but this can be difficult on their own. That’s why many choose to work with a personal injury attorney—an experienced advocate who can defend their legal rights and who understands the laws in this area.

Although many residents are increasingly aware of the risks of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, Maryland drunk driving accidents still occur with startling frequency. When an individual drives under the influence, they are more likely to make reckless decisions and harmful errors while driving—swerving into the other lane, running red lights, etc. These acts can cause significant damage or even death when they lead to Maryland motorcycle accidents. While there is of course a risk of accidents with any vehicles, motorcyclists are especially at risk for serious, life-threatening injuries due to the relative unprotection they have around their bodies compared to drivers in cars or trucks.

For example, just recently a motorcycle accident sent two to the hospital. According to a local news report from the second week of February, an intoxicated driver was driving northbound on the road when she veered into the southbound lane and collided head-on with a motorcyclist. There were two occupants on the motorcycle—the passenger and the driver. Following this shocking accident, both were seriously injured, and both had to be transported to a nearby hospital; one via helicopter and the other by ambulance. Their conditions are currently unknown, and the incident is still under investigation.

This tragic accident highlights two things. First, it’s an apt and unfortunate illustration of the risk Maryland motorcyclists face when they or another driver decides to go on the road under the influence. While individuals may think they are only taking a small risk for themselves, the reality is that driving intoxicated puts everyone else on the road at risk and could cause life-threatening injuries or even death. Unfortunately, motorcyclists are especially likely to be harmed due to someone else’s reckless actions.

Maryland motorcycle accidents can happen in the blink of an eye. Even one small mistake while driving or another unfortunate occurrence can cause a major crash leading to severe bodily injuries. In addition to the bodily harm that one might face as a result, however, Maryland motorcycle accidents can cause financial strain, primarily through medical bills and lost wages. And in the aftermath of these accidents, it can be difficult to know what to do or how to move forward. But there are some key things Maryland motorcyclists who are injured in motorcycle accidents should do afterward, to protect their legal rights and get themselves on the path to recovery, both physically and financially.

Immediately after the crash, a motorcyclist should report the accident. Letting authorities know about the crash and speaking with a police officer about what happened can aid the official investigation of the crash and help an accident victim understand what exactly occurred and who else was involved.

Individuals should also immediately seek medical treatment. Sometimes, motorcyclists may not realize the extent of their injuries right away and may not immediately seek help. But this can be a mistake. Not only can prompt medical attention prevent injuries from getting worse, but not seeking it immediately may weaken an accident victim’s future civil case against the individual who caused the accident. It is also important to continually keep up with medical appointments and treatment and follow the doctor’s advice while recovering from the injuries.

One of the fundamental things all Maryland residents learn when learning to drive is how to safely change lanes. Changing lanes is a common part of driving, and when done safely, it does not cause any harm. However, failure to follow safety protocols whilst changing lanes, or even just not paying attention, can cause serious harm to others—especially motorcyclists on the road. In fact, negligence while changing lanes can cause serious or even deadly Maryland motorcycle accidents, since motorcyclists have far less protection around their bodies than drivers of other vehicles and are more easily knocked onto the road.

Take, for example, a recent fatal motorcycle accident that killed a Maryland motorcyclist. The crash occurred on I-95, according to a local news report, around 4:30 one afternoon. A 29-year-old woman from New Jersey was driving along the interstate when she decided to merge left. However, she merged into the path of a motorcyclist, a 30-year-old woman from Odenton, Maryland. The cyclist was thrown from her motorcycle, causing severe injuries. She was taken to a nearby hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

The crash is still under investigation, but it provides a tragic illustration of how dangerous negligent lane changing can be. While the car could have changed lanes into the path of other vehicles—cars and trucks—the odds are that the resulting crash would have been less deadly, since drivers in cars and trucks are better protected by their vehicles. In addition, it is easier for drivers to spot cars and trucks in the other lanes, but harder to spot smaller motorcycles.

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